How to keep your top cat’s furin tip top shape!

Your cat is a very clean animal by nature and you will doubtless see him washing himself several times a day. He has a rough tongue which removes dead hair like lots of little brushes! However, he does need some help from you, and the amount of grooming required will depend very much on the kind of cat you have.


For instance, if you have a short haired cat you will only need to give him a small amount of brushing and combing, perhaps on a weekly basis, as they are very good at taking care of themselves. However a long haired cat will require much more attention from you, needing to be groomed all over on a daily basis to prevent the fur from becoming matted.

So, start when your cat is a kitten. Introduced at an early age, grooming will become routine and should be fun for both of you. A couple of minutes of very light brushing to get him used to the brush, perhaps increasing a little each day - ending with lots of praise and perhaps a treat - should soon get him looking forward to his daily session!

If you have an adult cat that hasn’t been used to the grooming process then, as with a kitten, start with short sessions to begin with, gradually increasing to 15 minutes. Firstly, make sure that the cat is relaxed, perhaps after a meal; stroke him and speak quietly to him. Show him the comb and brush and let him smell them. Comb him gently, you will probably find that he enjoys it, especially if he is a short haired cat, as there is unlikely to be any matting. The metal comb will show if there are any fleas present in the coat and if any treatment is required.


After the comb, move on to the brush and brush gently forwards towards the head and then smooth it back down to remove any loose hairs. Perhaps consider offering some treats along the way to make the process a Your cat is a very clean animal by nature and you will doubtless see him washing himself several times a day. He has a rough tongue which removes dead hair like lots of little brushes! However, he does need some help from you, and the amount of grooming required will depend very much on the kind of cat you have. pleasurable one.


With a long haired cat you will almost definitely encounter matting, especially if the cat hasn’t been groomed regularly in the past, in which case the matting will probably have to be cut off or de-matted by a professional groomer or a vet, post lockdown.

Always keep a check on your cat’s body language while you are grooming. If he appears unhappy and that tail starts twitching, stop immediately and try again later. There are many benefits to grooming your cat other than just keeping his coat looking good. Firstly, it helps you to keep a check on his health. If, from an early age, you get your cat used to being handled, you will be able to regularly check his ears, eyes, nose, mouth and check his body for any lumps. Anything which causes concern should be referred straight away to your vet.

Cat hair grows in cycles. It grows very quickly, then it stops for a while, then new hair grows again which pushes the older hair out. Brushing removes this old hair and, more importantly, reduces the chances of the cat licking and swallowing the old hair resulting in hairballs followed by digestive problems. Brushing also stimulates the glands to help waterproof the coat and helps to stimulate the circulation.

So by starting as soon as possible your cat will thank you for his regular grooming sessions, there will be fewer hairs on the sofa and the bond between you both will be stronger than ever!

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